The last danicing bears

Fasik Vasilj prepares Kuzia before her act.

On a small patch of grass in Rivne in northern Ukraine are some rusty circus wagons stabled, and the erect tent that has lost its colors look most sad out. But for the kids who have flooded the circus does not matter. Fasik Vasilj is 52 and has worked as bear tamer on various circuses for 25 years. In a month he goes into retirement, along with his bear Kuzia 15 years. -The strength ran out, he tells tired while he lights another cigarette .A few years ago, he had three bears, but he has given away two of them to a zoo, and Kuzia will retire in a preserve for old circus bears. When Ukraine would organize Euro 2012 banned dancing bears on the streets and there were a few freelance bear tamer touring circuses. But even they are moving away because of the new, harder, EU requirements which include more space for the animals. When I few days earlier landed in Kiev low fog over the city like an easy breath on a cold winter morning. Vladimir picked me up at the airport and throughout the car ride he complained of Ukraine maturity. -The people are tired of the corrupt politicians and the country seething with discontent. Kiev is two cities in one: on the one hand lies the Soviet shadow heavily over the suburbs, on the other hand lifted the city by its magnificent buildings, reflecting on the significance of the city actually had. Pale faces looking empty out the bus windows as we pass through and it ‘s hard not to think back to what the country had to undergo. Famine Disaster 1932-1933 reaped millions of lives, the Chernobyl disaster and a series of revolutions; recently the Orange. Next morning we set off on a seven -hour drive to meet Yuri and Helena. Yuri Tonkobiy is 48 years old and was born in Kazakhstan when his family sent there after World War II to work. Yuri patterned on the Russian fleet that took him around the globe, and with the boat ride were home he smuggled various animals which he sold in Moscow.In 1991, the sa